The truth behind the LinkedIn “Top 1%, 5%, 10% profile…” emails.

Did you get one of the – “Congratulations, You have one of the top 1% most viewed LinkedIn profiles for 2012?” emails from LinkedIn?

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Of course, there are lots of excited LinkedIn users.
There has been a lot of noise, mystery, and concern about these emails, too.

“Are they authentic?” “How could that be? I don’t even use LinkedIn?”

After looking at the number of profile views of a couple of clients, and talking to some fellow LinkedIn super connectors, I came to believe the emails were a marketing gimmick from LinkedIn to get users back to the website.

It definitely worked to get people asking questions, but I can’t say it did much for their brand.

So much for my “trusted network”!

My “trusted network” would never come up with a statically insignificant algorithm to spam me, or would they?

Here’s why you qualified for the email:

* The first million to join LinkedIn in countries with more than 2 million people.
* The first 500000 to join LinkedIn in countries with more than 1 million LinkedIn members

Most connections
* Upper 1, 5 and 10th percentile with the highest number of connections (except those with less than 100 connections).
* Upper 1, 5, and 10th percentile with the highest number of connections that have the top 10 most usual names (only first names, excluding those with less than 100 connections).

Most profile views
* Upper 1, 5, and 10th percentile with the highest number of profile views globally and for each country (exception: those with less than 150 status updates).

Most endorsements
* Upper 1, 5, and 10th percentile with the highest number of endorsements for skills from the top 10 percentile of skills.

Most status updates
* Upper 1, 5, and 10th percentile with the highest number of status updates in 2012 globally and per country (exception: those with less than 150 status updates).

Some weird stuff in here, like the exception of those with less than 150 status updates in the most profile views group, but that might be a typo in my source.

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  1. […] first cynical response was it was a marketing ploy similar to the one social media business site LinkedIn pulled off last year. LinkedIn started sending emails to users telling them they were among the top 1, 2, 5, 10 or 15 […]

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